November 21, 2017

The Dalai Lama and the Anatomy of PC Buddhism

The Dalai Lama and the Anatomy of
Politically Correct Buddhism

By James C. Stephens

But what conception of the world is hiding behind the smiling, so apparently philanthropic and peaceable mask of the Tibetan God-King? The ignorance that this key question exposes, particularly in the western world, can only be described as catastrophic. (Neue Zurcher Zeitung July 15, 1999 A German Newspaper)

Nearly three thousand tickets for the Annual “Distinguished Speaker’s Series” at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium featuring the Dalai Lama had sold out within an hour. Since no seats were available, I decided in Jay Leno fashion to go down and conduct some on the street interviews of people waiting to get a glimpse of the God-King of Tibet.

As that balmy October Southern California evening arrived, the air was filled with the anticipation of an opening night in Hollywood. Black limousines carrying the Dalai Lama and his US Diplomatic Secret Service escort pulled up to the Mediterranean style auditorium. A smattering of celebrities and Tibetan lamas with shaved heads dressed in maroon robes trimmed in golden yellow mingled in the large crowd lined up to pass through the specially installed security stations.

I was standing near “Heather” a slender hippyish woman in her twenties who was observing that evening’s crowd and occasionally seeing if a passerby had any extra tickets. Nonchalantly I asked her, “So, what brings you out here this evening?”

She replied, “Oh, I hitch hiked out here this summer from the Ozarks with my boyfriend to attend the Empowerment Ceremonies with the Dalai Lama. Tonight we decided to see if we could attend his public talk on Ethics for the New Millennium.”

“Will you be disappointed if you can’t get in?” I inquired.

Without hesitation she mused, “Not really. I’ve been watching all the well-dressed people going in and decided they probably need to hear him more than I do.”

Since she was open I posed a slightly more personal question, “Hypothetically, let’s say that Jesus Christ and the Dalai Lama were to be standing here before you and you had the opportunity to choose one to follow. Who would you select?”

She paused for a moment and then said, “The Dalai Lama.” Observing my slightly baffled look, she confessed, “Well, he is the spiritual leader of our day who’s bringing everyone together. He seems to fit our times better, and although I find Jesus attractive, I don’t feel the same about most Christians.”

When asked why the Dalai Lama was so popular, she commented, “I think he is like the Wizard of Oz, reflecting people’s illusions of what they want to believe.”

At first I was taken aback, but recognized that her comments represent a growing segment of our society that wholeheartedly embraces Buddhism as their religion of choice and leaving no doubt that the Lotus is blooming in America. Studies have shown that there are presently over 1600 Buddhist temples, centers and monasteries in America, many of them Tibetan. [1] In the twelve years between 1985 and 1997, “more Buddhist meditation centers were established than the total number founded in the first eighty-five years of the twentieth century.” [i]

Currently Buddhism is being marketed to such a high degree that even Buddhists parody the Madison Avenue hype surrounding the Buddhist boom. Buddha books are big business, while magazines are a lucrative cottage industry supported by pages and pages of advertisements marketing everything from retreats, national conferences, the reincarnation of tea, salad dressings, Buddha beads, sneakers to smiling Tibetan lamas opening Toshiba laptops on the “rooftop of the world.” Huge billboards along LA freeways featured the smiling image of the Dalai Lama advertising Apple’s “Think Different,” while the “Simpson’s,” a primetime cartoon program parodying American culture focused on little Lisa’s conversion to Tibetan Buddhism on their Christmas special.

As a college student who had converted to Buddhism in 1970, like Heather, I had been enamored with the exotic religious rituals, smells of incense, chants, and ancient stories of Buddha’s life and teachings. Myths like the life of the Buddha convey powerful images to believer and non-believer alike. Ignoring those myths in global affairs can bring dire consequences, e.g., Wahabism, the radical fundamentalist Islam of Osama Bin Laden. Approaching a worldview different from our own requires freedom to think critically and a “civil public square” [ii] that embraces discussion and debate, essential components for the survival of the human race. In certain Buddhist countries, nationalism is equated with religious expression, e.g., “To be Thai is to be Buddhist, to be Buddhist Thai.” The same holds true in Tibet and other Buddhist nations where there is no separation of Church and State and constitutionally Kings are required to be Buddhist.

Doctrine of Assimilation. Over the last 2500 years, the Buddhist faith has developed a highly sophisticated process of expansion and of contextualizing its religious message. The historic doctrine of assimilation (honji-suijaku) allows Buddhism to compete with the highly established indigenous religions in countries as it attempts to take root.

Its first approach is to the indigenous host culture. As Buddhism took hold in China, which at the time was primarily Confucian and Taoist, this took the form of introducing the Buddhist law (Dharma). The next time-consuming step over a period of eighty years involved the translation of their scriptures into the language of the host country. For the West, this occurred during the pinnacle of the British Empire as Rhys Davids, Max Müller, Daniel Gogerley, and a host of scholars belonging to the Pali Text Society translated numerous Buddhist texts which were incorporated into the voluminous Sacred Books of the East and brought Buddhism to the attention of English speaking audiences worldwide.

During the third step of the process, Buddhists seek out the areas of commonality with the host culture’s faith, thereby appearing to have much in common with their own religion. [iii] In the West, we now find a plethora of books written in this genre by Buddhist teachers, e.g., The Good Heart: A Buddhist Perspective on the Teachings of Jesus by the Dalai Lama, Living Buddha, Living Christ by Thich Nhat Hanh, or The Zen Teachings of Jesus by Kenneth S. Leong.

A careful reading of the Dalai Lama’s book Ethics for the New Millennium bears little resemblance at all to a traditional view of Buddhist ethics. His “consensus ethics” represents the assimilation of a variety of different religious viewpoints which don’t require a person to be a member of any religion. Like a chameleon this enables the Dalai Lama to blend into many different religious settings, granting him access to an enormous secular audience yearning for spiritual answers.

Historical Cause for Concern. The Office of the Dalai Lama has systematically developed the doctrine of “skillful means” (upayakaushalya) over 1300 years. Tibet, as an isolated and sparsely populated country with a weak standing army, is strategically located between four historical military giants, China, Mongolia, Russia, and India. Consequently, it has had to rely upon its religious and political prowess to survive.

Historically, Tibet was not always Buddhist. Tibetans in fact were followers of Bön (pronounced “pern”), an indigenous faith which centered on Shamans who worshipped fierce mountain gods and other demonic spirits. [iv] In 642 A.D. the Tibetan King Srong-btsan-sgampo granted his Chinese and Nepalese wives’ wish to introduce Buddhism.

A little over a hundred years later in 745 A.D., an Indian Tantric Buddhist Padmasambhava made a journey to Tibet and taught that humans could reach enlightenment in one lifetime. At the request of the Tibetan Buddhist King Detsan, he “waged war against and conquered all the malignant gods in Tibet, only sparing those that promised to become Defenders of the Law (Dharmapala).” Padmasambhava introduced the systematic practice of theTantras [2] to Tibetans which involved the use of spells (mantras [3]), circles of deities arranged in sand paintings (mandalas), symbolic sexual union with deities (deity yoga), occult hand gestures (mudras) and magic. [v]

Co-opting control of Tibet from the Bön rulers was accomplished through power encounters with the local gods. One researcher found actual drawings and discovered that when Buddhists originally tried to establish their authority over Tibet’s Bön kingdom by building an altar on the capital’s grounds, it was always torn down.

Frustrated by their lack of success, they consulted their oracles who instructed them on how to secure that authority. They were instructed to locate spiritual power points throughout the nation and then to build altars and make offerings to local topographical gods on mountain peaks, valleys, rivers and lakes. After the Buddhists completed their assignment they noticed that the points on the national map took the form of a demoness who was “nailed down.” They were then able to establish authority over the national capital and build the Jokhang Temple located at the “heart of the woman.” [vi]Consequently, some Buddhologists speculate that Tibetan Buddhism is founded upon the symbolic subjugation of a woman nailed down and metaphysically alive at the bottom of the lake near the Johkang. This is in Lhasa, the ‘city of the gods’, the capital of Tibet, and the former residence of the Dalai Lama, the Potala Palace.

Later, as the Moslem invaders were destroying Buddhism in Northern India, the Mongols were led by Genghiz Khan in 1206 in a war to establish his kingdom across China and Mongolia. The Tibetan lamas seized this opportunity to convert the notorious Khan to Tibetan Buddhism prior to his becoming the Emperor of China. This symbiotic relationship of patron-priest served them both well as the Tibetan Grand Lama became a vassal-ruler of Tibet and spiritual advisor to the Emperor.

Because of the corruption of the Tibetan monastic centers, a reform movement arose called the “dGe-lugs-pa“(pronounced Gelak) literally the “Model of Virtue” recognized by their “yellow hats.” This is the school of Tibetan Buddhism led by the Dalai Lama. Their school focuses upon the serious study of Tantric texts such as the Kalachakra [4] Tantra which forms the foundation of their national myth. [vii]

A key component of their religious agenda is the establishment of Shambhala, a global Buddhist empire, illuminated in the Kalachakra initiation. While researching the life of Agvan Dorzhiev, tutor to the XIII Dalai Lama and Lhasa’s emissary to Russia’s Tsar, John Snelling uncovered the “ShambhalaProject,” Dorzhiev’s vision of a great Buddhist empire. “Many Kalachakra devotees, including the present Dalai Lama believe that it is an actual place.”[viii] Dorzhiev “skillfully” negotiated the political support of the Bolshevik regime in his religious vision by stating that “Buddhist doctrine is largely compatible with current Communist thinking.” [ix]

The “Shambhala Project” incorporated Geshe Wangyal, a key Tibetan Buddhist leader from Kalmykia (a Tibetan Buddhist Republic in the former USSR). Fleeing the “full brunt of Stalin’s wrath” in 1952, Kalmyk refugees were the first group of Tibetan Buddhists to see Lady Liberty. After resettling in New Jersey, they established a Tibetan Buddhist temple and “in 1955, the eminent Kalmyk Lama Geshe Wangyal (1901-83) came to minister there.[x]

Who is the Dalai Lama and What Does He Believe? The term Dalai Lama describes the Office of God-King of Tibet (not unlike the term Pope of Roman Catholicism) and literally means “Ocean of Wisdom.” It was first ascribed to Sonam Gyatso (1543) the Gelak Buddhist reformer by Altan Khan, the leader of Mongolia. Tibetan followers refer to him by the title “Kundun” meaning “the Presence.”

The phrase “the Lama knows” is commonly heard throughout all strata of Tibet’s priest dominated society. Its’ early kings established the divine right of priest-kings and enforced “absolute submission to a religiously charismatic individual.” [xi] For the laity, it is impossible to achieve enlightenment without the instruction of a private lama (guru). From childhood Tibetans are taught to worship the Four Jewels paying; “homage first to the Lama (spiritual master), then to the Buddha, Dharma (Law of Buddhism), and Sangha (priestly community).” [xii]

Reincarnation or Patisandhi (lit. Reunion, Relinking) is a foundational belief of Tibetan Buddhism, wherein an individual’s consciousness or mind is reborn lifetime after lifetime based upon the karmic conditions of their previous existence. Karma is the sum total of “the wholesome or unwholesome actions by body (kaya-kamma), speech (vaci-kamma) and mind (mano-kamma)” which will determine when, where and what form you will be born into, be it a peacock, snake, elephant, or king.

In each lamasery (monastery) approximately 30 lamas are accorded the rank of “noble monks” resulting from their recognition as reincarnations of previous lamas. One such story involves a young boy named Lhamo Thondup who was born in 1935 during the year of the Wood Hog in a small village in northeast Tibet. A group of Tibetan lamas disguised as merchants were led to his household by “a series of signs and visions” in their search for the new reincarnation of the recently deceased thirteenth Dalai Lama.

At the age of three, little Thondup took “hold of the prayer beads around the “servant’s” neck, which had belonged to the 13th Dalai Lama,” and demanded “to be given them saying they were his.” [xiii] These signs along with a physical examination, led the lamas to believe he was indeed the 14th Dalai Lama, considered to be an incarnation of Avalokitsevara, the patron deity of Tibet believed to be able to save all living beings. To obtain his release they paid a large ransom demanded by the local Muslim Governor.

At the age of five he was enthroned in Tibet’s Potala Palace, taken to the Jokhang Temple for ordination, had his head shaved and was renamed “Tenzin Gyatso.” For the next eight years his tutors trained him in the monastic curriculum and the art of leading a nation. He was also schooled in theoccult praxis of Tibetan Buddhism based upon ritualistic chanting of sutras and the magical incantation of Om mani padme hum.

Unlike salvation within Christianity wherein an individual relies upon the unmerited favor of God and through faith personally accepts Christ’s finished work of redemption on the Cross, the religion of Tibetan Buddhism is based upon a rigorous system of works righteousness through which an individual accumulates enough merit to achieve deliverance from the wheel of Samsara or cycle of rebirths. These works primarily include the redundant recitation of incantations (mantras and sutras), proscribed religious rites and an assortment of mechanistic practices utilizing Buddhist rosary beads, prayer wheels, prayer flags, mani stones, visualization of demonic entities and symbolic offerings.

Those disciples who are on a fast track to enlightenment would include attendance of their guru’s empowerment ceremonies, performance of Tantric rituals, deity yoga (being spiritually yoked to Tibetan gods) and other acts, some of which are too vile to mention. Herein, they perform rigorous acts of asceticism which deny the contemptible flesh, whereby they hope to make significant merit to attain the short path of liberation and attain nirvana, “the ultimate and absolute deliverance from all future rebirth, old age, disease and death, from all suffering and misery.”

The Public Relations Department. How is it that wherever the Dalai Lama ventures, that the seemingly Teflon mystique of “Shangri-La” follows him? Originally the myth seems to have found its voice through the writings of James Hilton, the author of Lost Horizons and Lowell Thomas’s radio programs about his adventures in Tibet. [xiv] Movie Director, Frank Capra perpetuated the myth of “Shangri-La,” a mysterious hidden kingdom through “Lost Horizons” (1937).

Rarely though does the Dalai Lama speak of his country’s historical problems with feudalism or his political contacts with Neo-Socialists. In Tricycle, a quarterly Buddhist magazine, Alex McKay explores the Nazi expedition to Tibet in 1939 involving five members of Hitler’s Secret Service. Their anthropological studies sought to confirm evidence of Hitler’s “idea of racial perfection that would justify their views on world history and German supremacy.” [xv] This became a source of embarrassment to the producers of “Seven Years in Tibet” which quickly glossed over Heinrech Harrer’s SS connection to Adolf Hitler.

Dr. Erwin Lutzer, pastor of Moody Bible Church in Chicago, shared his concern about Tibet’s connection with Nazi Germany in Hitler’s Cross, a startling expose. He wrote,

Karl Haushofer became Hitler’s mentor. Haushofer had made several trips to India and was well versed in eastern occultism. He also lived in Japan for a time where he was initiated into an esoteric Buddhist sect called the “Green Dragon.” Through these contacts a colony of Tibetan lamas settled in Berlin, and when the Russians took the city in 1945, they found a thousand Tibetan corpses in German uniforms. Haushofer, more than any other, challenged Hitler with the vision of world conquest. [xvi]

The newer contacts of the Dalai Lama with Neo-Nazis are equally troubling. On several occasions he has met with Chilean diplomat Miguel Serrano, the leader of the National Socialist Party of Chile who is the “ideologist of esoteric Hitlerism.” Serrano was a student of ‘Julius Evola (1898-1974) WWII Italian Fascist dictator Benito Mussolini’s chief ideologist, who was heavily influenced by Tibetan Tantricism.’ [xvii]

The remarkable tenure of the Dalai Lama as God-King for life surpasses every President we’ve had since Franklin D. Roosevelt. Although most nations do not officially recognize Tibet as a sovereign nation, they still allow the Dalai Lama the liberty to speak from his platform as a religious leader, even though they have little knowledge of Tibetan Buddhism’s global agenda or its worldview. As a religious and political foreign guest, the Dalai Lama has mastered the Buddhist art of “skillful means” (Upaya) and utilizes his position to propagate Tibetan Buddhism believing “the end, justifies the means.”

In October 1950, “his age of innocence was swept away as eighty thousand (Chinese) soldiers marched into Chamdo and started the “peaceful liberation” of Tibet.” [xviii]

Commencing at fifteen the Dalai Lama formally assumed the reign of authority as the temporal and spiritual ruler of Tibet and directly dealt with the Chinese occupation until his escape in March 1959. Moment’s before leaving, the Dalai Lama presented a long silk scarf to his personal protector deity,Mahakala. [5] He later commented, “This is the traditional Tibetan gesture on departure and signifies not only propitiation, but also implies the intention of return.”

The US political ties with the Dalai Lama extend back to the CIA’s secret operations as overseen by President’s Eisenhower, Kennedy and Johnson. [xix]In 1956, the US government secretly trained 300 Tibetan Khamba warriors in Colorado’s Winter Training camp to assist the Dalai Lama, who later “thanked the CIA for organizing some of the guerrillas who protected him during his flight into Indian exile in 1959.” [xx]

How did the Dalai Lama rise to such a high level of international recognition? After his escape, he spent much time concentrating on establishing the Tibetan government-in-exile in Dharamsala, India and encouraging Tibetans to engage in non-violent opposition to the Communist occupation of Tibet. Subsequent travels to Japan and Thailand in 1967 cemented his ties with Asian Buddhists.

In 1973, his first exposure to the West focused on visits to the Tibetan Diaspora in Switzerland and a meeting with Pope Paul IV. His biggest shock came when he found that the next generation of Swiss Tibetans could not speak Tibetan. Upon his 1979 arrival in the United States, the New York Timesheadline greeted him with the now abused greeting, “Hello Dalai!”

During his second journey to the US in July 1981, the Dalai Lama conducted the first Kalachakra Initiation in the West at the Deer Park Buddhist Center in Madison, Wisconsin. Coinciding with the Year of the Iron Bird, they symbolically fulfilled an ancient prophecy of Padmasambhava issued in 745 A.D., “When the Iron Bird flies to the land of the red man, the Dharma will come to the West.”

The Kalachakra Tantra was first preached by the Buddha who explained the spiritual practices necessary to remove obstacles blocking the path to Buddhahood. The Tantric texts include over twelve thousand stanzas, numerous expositions and commentaries written over the last 2,500 years passed to Tibet through Indian Tantric adepts. Normally, before Tibetan lamas are allowed to study Tantric practices, they are required to graduate from regular monastic studies. Concern has been expressed by Tantric practitioners that the Kalachakra initiation is being offered so openly to unprepared Western audiences.

Geshe (Dr.) Ngawang Dhargyey gave an explanation of the Kalachakra to his Seattle students in 1983 which revealed that Tantric teachings were designed as medicine for specific students. Monks typically forbidden to take alcohol or to engage in sexual intercourse with women by the monastic discipline were told that this rule was meant for lower beings. He reasoned that “these same activities can further one towards the attainment of enlightenment” and that highly realized teachers can transform “the five ambrosias” e.g., excrement, urine, menstrual blood and “experience great bliss.”[xxi]

A reading of the Dalai Lama’s commentary on the Kalachakra creates understandable room for concern. Provisional and definitive justification was given to certain followers who had achieved a level of great altruism and compassion, permitting acts that ranged from killing “persons who are harmful to the teaching;” speaking “untrue words” for worthwhile purposes; “stealing others’ wealth” or “mates;” and finally permitting the use of intoxicants, the five ambrosias, and the five fleshes. [xxii] Whether these statements are meant to be taken literally or not is a question well worth posing to the Buddhist community. For us as Christians, they represent doctrines which definitely need to be exposed, but at the same time are too shameful to mention in public.

After thirty years of exile in India, the Dalai Lama was invited to Sweden where he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989 for his non-violent efforts to resolve the Chinese armed occupation of Tibet. The first major door, the Prize, opened for his cause was “The International Year of Tibet” in 1990 which was celebrated in schools, museums, and cities around the globe. Since then the Dalai Lama’s notoriety has dramatically increased.

The Dalai Lama’s Popularity

For false christs and false prophets will rise and show great signs and wonders to deceive, if possible, even the elect (Matthew 24:24).

Why do Americans so wholeheartedly embrace him? Founded by political and religious immigrants who fled from repressive regimes, Americans are characterized as a people of goodwill who have a compassionate heart for the oppressed. Slowly, as knowledge of the Chinese invasion of Tibet grew and stories of the gruesome deaths of nearly a million Tibetans through violence or starvation became public, Americans committed to issues of freedom and justice took a strong stand against the repression of Tibetans’ human rights and the systematic destruction of 7500 Buddhist monasteries.

That same year, America welcomed one thousand Tibetan refugees following the passage of the “1990 Tibetan Refugee Resettlement Act” introduced by Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass). Since then the Free Tibet movement has been vigorously promoted by an influential Washington lobby spearheaded by Senator Patrick Moynihan, former Ambassador to India, his daughter Maura, and Richard Blum, philanthropist, President of the Himalayan Foundation and husband of Senator Diane Feinstein. Assisted by the notoriety and financial backing of Hollywood celebrities Richard Gere, Steven Seagal, Harrison Ford, and the Beastie Boys’ Adam Yauch, the cause found a global stage.

Hollywood has become the Dalai Lama’s most significant public relations department.

The twentieth anniversary re-release of “Star Wars” continues to underscore Hollywood’s public love affair with the postmodern Buddhist illusion. According to Director Irving Kirschner, “The Empire Strikes Back” was “designed to introduce Zen Buddhism to children.” [xxiii] Yoda was the proverbial Zen Master. Lucas Films production of the “Phantom Menace” focused on the council’s selection of the next incarnation of a Jedi Knight closely paralleling the process through which each successive Dalai Lama is selected. Would it be unfair to say that the Dalai Lama is the contemporary physical embodiment of Yoda in our popular culture’s consciousness?

A number of years ago, I received a knock at my office door from a neighbor who had caught a glimpse of our ministry sign. He said he was a member of the Friends of the Western Buddhist Order and had moved from Seattle after being hired as Director of Public Relations for Disney. So it wasn’t a surprise when I later heard that Disney was backing Martin Scorcese’s production on the Dalai Lama’s life called “Kundun” for a cool $30 million. Scorcese you may recall previously produced the controversial film, “The Last Temptation of Christ.”

The historical revisionist production “Seven Years in Tibet” attracted a large following in Europe and America who flocked to see Brad Pitt’s portrayal of Nazi Stormtrooper Heinrech Harrer and his ensuing adventures in Tibet featuring his stumbling inter-cultural relationship with the Dalai Lama. Following the film’s release, the monthly number of hits on the Free Tibet Website increased from 500 to 40,000.

The distinction of being the first Tibetan Buddhist Lama from America goes to Columbia University Professor Robert Thurman, father of actress Uma Thurman. It is rumored that Thurman, who has been mentored by Geshe Wangyal and the Dalai Lama is Dorjiev’s successor and closely connected to his vision of the Shambhala utopia. Referred to as “the Billy Graham of Buddhism” Thurman openly “maintains he will be able to celebrate the Buddhization of the USA within his lifetime.” [xxiv]

In 1991, as Director of Tibet House in New York City which he co-founded with Richard Gere, he sponsored “the Kalachakra Initiation at New York’s Madison Square Garden.” [xxv] The Tibet Center houses a three dimensional Kalachakra Mandala and the only life sized statue of the Kalachakra deity outside of Tibet. Following the first World Trade Center bombing in 1993, “The Samaya Foundation, the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, and the Port Authority jointly sponsored the Wheel of Time (Kalachakra) Sand Mandala, or Circle of Peace, in the lobby of Tower 1.” [xxvi] For over thirty days, many of the World Trade Center workers and visitors were invited by the Namgyal Monks to participate in the construction of the mandala. It is said that,

Its shape symbolized nature’s unending cycle of creation and destruction and in the countless grains of its material, it celebrated life’s energy taking ephemeral form, then returning to its source. At the end of the mandala’s month long lifespan, the monks swept up the sand and “offered it to the Hudson River.” This ritual, they believed, purified the environment[xxvii]

For ten days in August 1993, the Palmer Hilton in Chicago was buzzing as 6,000 delegates from a variety of religious backgrounds attended the Centennial Celebration of the Parliament of the World’s Religions. The religious leader that all the eyes of the media focused on was the XIV Dalai Lama, the God-King of Tibet who easily emerged out of the Parliament as the Pluralist Pope.

Now whatever city the Dalai Lama visits, lights flash, noisy keyboards churn out the standard lines and cry for a “Free Tibet!” One moment he seriously addresses human rights abuse in Tibet and the next exhibits an attitude of humorous curiosity that the public finds attractive. The global oral cuisine he delivers with few variations is kindness, compassion and world peace, with a twist of don’t change the faith you’re born with, be tolerant and don’t proselytize.

Dr. David Woodward, a Christian scholar who has sympathetically followed the plight of Tibetans for the last fifty years commented, “It is, of course, ridiculous for him to criticize Christian witness when he himself is engaged in proselytizing westerners.” [xxviii] It was blatantly obvious to Tibet watchers during the spring of 2001, when in Oregon 9,000 hand-picked high school representatives were selected to attend a talk given by the Dalai Lama who encouraged them to become ambassadors of peace. His texts were required pre-reading. And yet, not many of his inviters really knew who this “simple monk” was.

The Dalai Lama as a religious and political globetrotter is reticent to acknowledge his dubious contacts with fringe groups. One such leader is Shoko Asahara, leader of Aum Shinrikyo (a Buddhist apocalyptic Sect) who also holds to a vision of a global Buddhist empire (Shambhala). Asahara is now being tried in Japan for the poison gas attack on a Tokyo subway which injured 5,000 and killed twelve in 1995.

Meetings with the Pope and extensive dialogues with many Catholics such as the late Thomas Merton, who he referred to as a close friend “who taught me a deeper way” than the Bible [xxix] cause one to question the global agenda of this “simple monk.” One closed session of the “Buddhist-Christian Monastic Dialogue” brought together Benedictine and Trappist Monks with the Dalai Lama and other Tibetan Buddhist lamas in a discussion to explore their religious differences and similarities, while Loyola Marymount University opened its doors hosting lamas who built a mandala on its campus. Bryan Borys, a Catholic Professor at USC who attended the Dalai Lama’s three day teaching in Pasadena said, “I think he’s the closest thing to a hero that anyone has around here nowadays.” [xxx]

Evidence that his tolerance is clearly pragmatic is seen as he skillfully exercises care not to offend his hosts be they Mormon, Catholic or Hindu. And yet, his embrace of pluralism is clearly in keeping with the goals of his exclusivist school of Buddhism. After advancing “five arguments against the existence of God” at a talk to a pro-Buddhist audience, he went onto deny the “soteriological (salvific) claims of Christianity,” while holding fast to the “truth that Tibetan Buddhism will be found to make final sense, in contrast to all rival claims and other religions.” As for mission, he maintained, “If Buddhists themselves have to wait, perhaps many lifetimes for their goal, why should we expect that it would be different for non-Buddhists?” [xxxi]

As Christians we hold to the principal that one will reap what one sow’s, but unlike Buddhists we only believe in one lifetime (Heb. 9:27) and that we can not atone for our sins alone (Eph.2:8-9). Robert B. Ekvall (1898-1978), a 19th century anthropologist and missionary to Tibetan nomads penned the words to one of his converts who understood the Good News of Christ’s incarnation. He wrote,

It is ordered for man to die once and after that to be judged. That word once makes the road of life a straight line. We cannot change it. The Complete Perfection [God] that made all things, the great powerful One has ordered it. His honored order stands. We must die once. Not many times, between many rebirths, but one. After that we must be judged from the sins and the sin–leaf, branch, and root. Life is no succession of circles, but a straight line, leading from one time without end to another time without end. It is but once: once to live, once to choose, once to win or lose, once to be saved, or once to be lost. [xxxii]

For Tibetan Buddhists “nothing has inherent existence.” Ultimate truth for Buddhism is relative contrasted to the Christian view where it represents an eternally non-negotiable matter leading to spiritual life or spiritual death. Ultimately doctrine does affect the fruit produced through practice. Belief behaves.

Unlike the Judaeo-Christian immigrants from Europe admitted through Ellis Island a century before, Tibetans arriving from Asia have a religious worldview diametrically opposed to a belief in One God. Resettlement in Los Angeles, Seattle, Minneapolis and thirteen other sites was carefully rethought after the Dalai Lama’s experience of the Tibetan Diaspora’s cultural deterioration in Switzerland. After studying persecuted Jews’ pattern for survival, he purposely encouraged resettlement in cluster sites complete with a resident Buddhist lama, craftsman, artisans, and families to maintain their cultural and religious cohesiveness.

In community after community, the Dalai Lama seems to find acceptance. We identify with other’s stories, for in many ways it is our own story retold. When the Dalai Lama received the “Simon Wiesenthal Peace Prize” in 1996, the Jewish community readily identified with the genocide experienced by the Tibetans and likened him to “Aaron, our man of peace.” He then suggested to the audience that his people had much to learn from the Jews about preserving a minority religious culture that faced extinction. And yet all pilgrims are not alike.

As I listened to the presentation, conflicting pictures flashed through my mind. The Dalai Lama at the Wailing Wall in Jerusalem juxtaposed to his close friendships with Nazis from World War II like Heinrech Harrer stirred up some unsettled feelings about this “Oz of Tibet.” Christians who had served Tibetan refugees in the early days expressed a strange alarm at the Dalai Lama’s rapid rise to global prominence. Secular Tibet watchers on the other hand said society needed a man of peace like the Dalai Lama.

The passage from the prophet Daniel in 537 B.C. was particularly striking to me in that setting as I contemplated the reality of the manifest presence of a “man of peace” who will in the end demand worship of himself. I meditatively read,

And through his policy also he shall cause craft to prosper in his hand; and he shall magnify himself in his heart, and by peace shall destroy many: he shall also stand up against the Prince of Princes; but he shall be broken without hand (Dan 8:25 KJV).

A Modern Trojan Horse? “They that do not study history are doomed to repeat it.” Victor and Victoria Trimondi, two radical German Buddhists who were instrumental in inviting the Dalai Lama to Germany wrote, “Only the worst villain could disagree with what he has said and written.” After responding to his encouragement to convert to Tibetan Buddhism, they uncovered an extreme “metaphysical exploitation of women,” a vile connection between magic and politics, and “the foundation for an absolutistic system in which spiritual and worldly power are united in one person, the Dalai Lama.” [xxxiii]

Their findings were released in February 1999 in The Shadow of the Dalai Lama: Sexuality, Magic and Politics, an expose of 800 pages of carefully researched and reasoned arguments. The Trimondi’s take you on a painful spiritual journey that dismantles the West’s idealized image of Tibet and takes off the pacifist mask of the Dalai Lama, revealing a pantheon of warring deities and a skillful God-King who still acknowledges the guidance of theNechung Oracle [6] in all his important State decisions. A deity war is being waged today against the 20,000 followers of Shugden Dorje, whose worship was outlawed by the Dalai Lama and is being enforced by house-to-house searches in India.

They warn that the ‘Kalachakra Initiation is consciously devoted to the manipulation of believers and introduces “an aggressive military ethos” aiming at “the establishment of a global Buddhocracy” following a Buddhist war in 2327 waged against the followers of Mohammed, Abraham, and Jesus.’ [xxxiv]

In light of Tibet’s historical takeover of Bön, one might be tempted to seriously ask, “Do we as Americans understand the Buddhist worldview that is motivating Tibetans to systematically build sand mandalas across America? Or are they simply sharing their art and culture to raise money to build prayer halls in Asia?” In October 1998, two groups of Tantric Buddhist monks began a tour across America and Canada to construct 100 sand mandalas which were predominantly financed by Gere Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. Their professed goal beyond raising funds simply was “to spread their knowledge to everyone who wants to learn about their traditions.” [xxxv]

In one of Karl Gustav Jung’s last works, “Flying Saucers: A Modern Myth,” he remarked that mandalas are the “pre-eminent symbol for our time” and appear in “situations of psychic confusion and perplexity.” [xxxvi] He went on to associate the psychological experience of the UFO phenomena with the “rotundum, the symbol of wholeness and the archetype that expresses itself in mandala form.” [xxxvii]

In the blockbuster movie, “Independence Day” you may recall the terror of citizens across the globe who helplessly observed alien ships attack earth in a global Armageddon. A review of the movie discloses alien ships assuming the form of giant air born mandalas, symbolically opening up as lotus flowers (euphemistic Tantric symbol for vagina in Buddhism) usurping power from giant buildings (phallic symbolism) that penetrated the skies. Prior to the White House’s destruction by an alien ship, a split second shot of a small framed picture of the Dalai Lama and the President is revealed in the Oval Office.

According to the Trimondi’s, “the Kalachakra sand mandala is a means of occult possession of the territory in which it is created” [xxxviii] including the waters where it is dispersed, reminding one of their original strategy of conquest in Tibet. Some Buddhists theorize it brings peace, while other Buddhist scholars speculate it brings destruction in its wake. One such mandala was sponsored by the Smithsonian Institution as part of a $6,500,000 Summer 2000 Folk Life Festival featuring “Tibet Land Beyond the Snows” on the Capitol Mall in Washington, DC. Over 2,500,000 visitors attended the exhibit replete with Tibetan temple, prayer monument, prayer wheels, pornographic Tantric idols and chanting lamas.

Caveat Emptor. In the overcrowded marketplace of ideas, where every guru, priest, and religious leader is being promoted as the solution to the world’s problems, “buyers beware” is a watchword to be taken quite seriously. Maybe my apprehension arises out of my experience as a Buddhist in the 70’s hearing all the talk about peace, compassion and kindness from leaders who in the same breathe spoke in condescending tones about the superiority of Buddhism. Critical thinking however, doesn’t need to go out the door when we are hosting, interacting or sharing our faith with those of other religious persuasions.

Christians have a duty to investigate religious systems that impact their lives and to effectively proclaim the Gospel in full understanding of the context of world history. Os Guinness, born in China, educated at Oxford, at a talk at La’bri in 1973 issued a stern warning to the Church it has yet to heed:

The swing to the East has come at a time when Christianity is weak at just those points where it would need to be strong to withstand the East. Without this strength, the Eastern religions will be to Christianity a new, dangerous Gnosticism, but this time much of the fight will be lost before many see the nature of the danger. [xxxix]

I have observed Tibetan lamas in local host museums teaching young children how to make mandalas who were innocently unaware of their proximity to malevolent spirits. Even Tibetan lamas recognize dangerous demons that manifest during the construction of mandalas and perform ritual offerings to them to prevent their own possession by demonic spirits. The late Mas Toyotomi, a Japanese American who served with Japanese Evangelical Missions Society warned,

Satan’s subtle strategy is to camouflage idolatry in such a way that even Christians do not recognize it as such. Because there is practically no preaching against idolatry in America, they are vulnerable to the temptations of modern sophisticated idolatry.[xl]

The watchman’s warning is clear (Ezekiel 33:4). The Tibetan Buddhist World Peace Vase Project [7] recently completed its’ first global target, America. Tantric vases have now been buried in every state, key National Parks, significant mountain peaks, Capital cities, lakes, and major waterways. Tibetan Tantric Lamas continue to build mandalas at Universities, museums, buildings and temples in America financed by major foundations. In the Old Testament, God “abandoned Israel because it was filled “with idols” and “influences from the east.”

Rather than serving God and loving Him, they “mingled with the nations and learned their practices which were detestable to the Lord. So the Lord “gave them into the hand of the nations and those who hated them ruled over them” (Psalm 106:40b). It is our duty to flee idolatry and to expose the deeds of darkness. Our battle is not against Tibetans for whom Jesus Christ gave His life, but rather it is for them by wrestling against the ruling spirits of darkness that have kept them in spiritual bondage for centuries (Eph. 6:12).

As the Apostle Paul observed the spirituality of the people of Athens at Areopagus near the Acropolis, he found an altar with this inscription, “TO AN UNKNOWN GOD.” What therefore you worship in ignorance, this I proclaim to you” (Acts 17:23). To those who profess to be followers of Buddhism, I call attention to your Scripture,

Verily, there is an Unborn, Unoriginated, Uncreated, Unformed. If there were not this Unborn, Unoriginated, Uncreated, Unformed; Escape from the world of the born, the originated, the created, the formed would not be possible (Ud.VIII.3). [xli]

This “Uncreated” is Jehovah God, unborn because He is the unchanging I AM. He is above time and desires to be known and that humanity not be ignorant of His path of deliverance (John 20:30-31). The greatest Mystery of all is that He would physically reveal Himself through His Incarnation as Immanuel (God with us). To those seekers who have eyes to see and ears to hear all creation manifests His handiwork and the heavens speak of his glory. Tibetan Buddhists recognize the power of speech. Seek the “Uncaused Cause”, the Creator who spoke the heavens and the earth into existence from nothing (Gen. 1:1).

There is a dualism, marking a profound distinction between God and His creation in sharp opposition to the Buddhist monism which holds that all creation is divine. Without the Uncreated Cause there is no deliverance from the created cycle of sin conceived through the loins of our own ancestors and our intrinsic relationship with their fall. The Dalai Lama has himself said, “I am not perfect.” And yet, there is a promise of deliverance from that cycle of sin through the only perfect Master who “committed no sin, nor was any deceit found in his mouth” (I Peter 2:23). His name is the LORD Jesus Christ whose boundless merit can only be appropriated by faith. He still offers the invitation,

I am the door. If anyone enters by Me, he will be saved… The thief does not come except to steal, and to kill, and to destroy. I have come that they may have life, and that they may have it more abundantly (John 10:9-10). [xlii]


Footnotes:

[1] A map of Buddhism in America may be viewed online (http://www.AProphetsReward.com/invasion/tibetans.jpg), which is composed from a number of sources including Morreale’s Buddhist America: Centers, Retreats, and Practices.

[2] Tantras according to Christmas Humphrey’s Popular Dictionary of Buddhism (pg. 192-93) are “writings dating from the sixth century A.D. in India…whose “meaning is handed down from Guru to Chela. Both symbolize the basic duality of manifestation in figures, in sculpture or in pictures, composed of some deity or aspect of Reality with a female partner locked in sexual embrace…(In) the Tantras of Tibet the female represents Wisdom (Prajna), and the male the active ‘use’ or compassionate ‘skill in means’ of that wisdom.”

[3] Mantra is defined by Humphrey’s as “A magical formula or invocation used in Tantric Bsm. In Tibet and in the Shingon School of Japan. The practice is based on a scientific knowledge of the occult power of sound. The most famous Mantra is Om Mani Padme Hum.”

[4] The Kalachakra (God of the Wheel of Time) Tantra is a ritual empowerment initiated by a Tibetan Buddhist Master, such as the Dalai Lama who initiates a disciple or group of disciples into the Shambhala kingdom of the Adi-Buddha (universal religious monarch). This is accomplished through a series of secret, active empowerments based upon Buddhist myths that utilize “deity yoga” ( lit. “yoked with Brahman” a Hindu god).

[5] According to Alice Getty, “Mahakala, a.k.a., “Dharmapala,” “The Great Black One,” is “the tutelary god of Mongolia who was not popular until the sixteenth century, when the Dalai-lama was summoned to the court of Altan Khan, and so influenced the king that all non-Buddhist idols were burned, and the six-armed Mahakala was proclaimed Protector of the Mongolian Buddhists.” A manifestation of the god of wealth.

[6] The Nechung Oracle is a human being, submitted to the Dalai Lama who is specially designated to receive demonic impartation verbally instructing the Dalai Lama on key decisions.

[7] The Tibetan Buddhist World Peace Vase Project, http://www.siddharthasintent.org/peace/n_amarica/us.htm


[i] Morreale, Don, 1998 The Complete Guide to Buddhist America. Boston: Shambhala.

[ii] Guinness, Os, 1993 The American Hour: A Time of Reckoning and the Once and Future Role of Faith. New York: Free Press.

[iii] Matsunaga, Alicia, 1969 The Buddhist Philosophy of Assimilation. Tokyo: Voyager’s Press.

[iv] Parrinder, Geoffrey, 1971 A Dictionary of Non-Christian Religions. Philadelphia: Westminster Press, pg. 48.

[v] Ling, T.O., 1972 A Dictionary of Buddhism: A Guide to Thought and Tradition. New York: Charles Scribner & Sons. (pp. 245-252).

[vi] 2000 Report from research at a Tibetan monastery shared at a consultation.

[vii] Banerjee, Anukul Chandra, 1984 Aspects of Buddhist Culture from Tibetan Sources. Firma KLM Private Limited: Calcutta,).

[viii] Snelling, John, 1993 Buddhism in Russia: The Story of Agvan Dorzhiev, Lhasa’s Emissary to the Tsar. Rockport, MA: Element Books Limited, pg. xii, 78.

[ix]Ibid. pg. 193.

[x] Ibid. pg. 256.

[xi] Nakamura, Hajime, 1985 Ways of Thinking of Eastern Peoples. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, pg.327.

[xii] Ibid. 318.

[xiii] Farrer-Halls, Gill, 1998 The World of the Dalai Lama: An Inside Look at His Life, His People, and His Vision. Wheaton, Illinois: Quest Books-Theosophical Publishing House.

[xiv] Orville Schell, 2000 Virtual Tibet: Searching for Shangri-La from the Himalayas to Hollywood. New York: Henry Holt & Co.

[xv] McKay, Alex, Spring 2001 “Hitler and the Himalayas: The SS Mission to Tibet 1938-1939.” Marion, Ohio: Tricycle: The Buddhist Review, pg. 65.

[xvi] Sklar, Dusty, 1977 The Nazis and the Occult. Dorset: New York, pp. 54, 23.

[xvii] Trimondi, Victor & Victoria, 2000 The Shadow of the Dalai Lama: Sexuality, Magic and Politics in Tibetan Buddhism. English Translation pre-release is through the courtesy of the Trimondi’s. H-M-R Medienagentur.

[xviii] Farrer-Halls, Gill, 1998 The World of the Dalai Lama. Wheaton, Ill: Quest Books, pg. 77.

[xix] Wooding, Dan, August 10, 1999 “How God Helped Save The Dalai Lama of Tibet.

[xx] Mirsky, Jonathan, July 18, 1999 “Mission Impossible: An Account of the C.I.A.’s Secret Operations in Tibet.” NY Times.

[xxi] Dhargyey, Geshe Ngawang, A Commentary on the Kalachakra Tantra. New Delhi: Library of Tibetan Works & Archives.

[xxii] Hopkins, Jeffrey, 1989 Kalachakra Tantra Rite of Initiation for the Stage of Regeneration: A Commentary on the Text of Kay-drup-ge-lek-bel-sang-bo by Tenzin Gyatso, the Fourteenth Dalai Lama, and the text itself. Wisdom Publications: London, pp. 350-351.

[xxiii] Amano, J. Yutaka & Geisler, Norman L., 1983 The Religion of the Force. Dallas: Quest Publications.

[xxiv] Trimondi, Victor & Victoria, 2000 The Shadow of the Dalai Lama: Sexuality, Magic and Politics in Tibetan Buddhism. English Translation pre-release is through the courtesy of the Trimondi’s. H-M-R Medienagentur.

[xxv] Farrer-Halls, Gill, 1998 The World of the Dalai Lama. Wheaton, IL: Quest Books-Theosophical Publishing House.

[xxvi] Darton, Eric, 1999 Divided We Stand: a Biography of New York’s World Trade Center. New York: Basic Books.

[xxvii] Ibid.

[xxviii] Woodward, David, 2001 Excerpt from the Author’s e-mail correspondence with Dr. David Woodward, March 2001.

[xxix] Former Buddhist Monk, 1993 The author’s eyewitness account in Chicago at the 1993 Parliament of the World’s Religions.

[xxx] Watanabe, Theresa, October 12, 1999 “Dalai Lama: Humble Man Inspires Awe.” Los Angeles Times.

[xxxi] D’Costa, Gavin

2000 The Meeting of Religions and the Trinity. “The Near Triumph of Tibetan Buddhist Pluralist-Exclusivism.” Maryknoll: Orbis Books, pp. 72-95.

[xxxii] Ekvall, Robert B., 1978 Tents Against the Sky. Westchester, IL: Good News Publishers, pp.249-250.

[xxxiii] Trimondi, Victor & Victoria, 2000 The Shadow of the Dalai Lama: Sexuality, Magic and Politics in Tibetan Buddhism. English Translation pre-release is through the courtesy of the Trimondi’s. H-M-R Medienagentur.

[xxxiv] Ibid.

[xxxv] Monk’s Tour website address: http://www.monkstour.org/

[xxxvi] Jung, C.G., 1959 Mandala Symbolism. Princeton, NJ: Bollingen Foundation.

[xxxvii] Ibid. pg. vi.

[xxxviii] Victor and Victoria Trimondi’s website: http://www.trimondi.de/en/med01.html

[xxxix] Guinness, Os, 1973 The Dust of Death: A Critique of the Counterculture. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, pg. 209.

[xl] Former Buddhist Monk, 1993 “Looking at Buddhist America and Keys to World Evangelization.” Pasadena, CA: The International Journal of Frontier Missions, pg. 111.

[xli] Nyanantiloka, 1972 Buddhist Dictionary: Manual of Buddhist Terms and Doctrines. Colombo, Ceylon: Frewin & Co., Ltd., pg. 106.

[xlii] The Holy Bible, New King James Version. 1982 Thomas Nelson, Inc.

The Tantric Takeover of Turtle Island-Lessons from Tibet

by James C. Stephens


“In the summer of 1981, the “iron bird year” of the Tibetan calendar, the god-king granted a public Kalachakra initiation for the first time outside of Asia. The date and the location (Wisconsin, USA) of the initiation were drawn directly from a prophecy of the Tibetan “religious founder”, Padmasambhava, who introduced Vajrayana to the Land of Snows from India in the eighth century:
“When the iron bird flies and the horses roll on wheels … the Dharma will come to the land of the Red Man”
(Bernbaum, 1982, p. 33). The iron birds — in the interpretation of this vision — are airplanes, the wheeled horses are automobiles, and the land of the Red Man (the American Indians) is the United States. During the ritual a falcon with a snake in its claws is supposed to have appeared in the sky. In it the participants saw the mythic bird, garuda, representing the patriarchal power which destroys the feminine in the form of a snake. [4]
Do we have here the image of a tantric wish according to which the West is already supposed to fall into the clutches of Tibetan Buddhism in the near future?”
The Shadow of the Dalai Lama-The Incarnation of the Tibetan gods
To All Concerned About the Future of Turtle Island,
This is a very important read to understand what the Tibetans are actually doing on Turtle Island. It is a well developed archetypal pattern.
Read the following article all the way through prayerfully. I am interacting with the article from Tibetan Digital Altar with bracketed comments, a few of my maps, some photos,  the map which I composed which actually takes their map and transposes it over Turtle Island and an earlier map I did of all the Buddhist temples, monasteries, tantric vases, sand mandalas, stupas, blood relic tour and Buddhist “art exhibits.”
 Here’s one map I put together of just the sand mandalas (red dots) and the tantric vases (green dots) which have been buried across the US.  (Does not include the overlay of the transposed nailed down body of the demoness (see below).
Mandalas and Tantric Vases in US
They are masters of ritual defilement. I still don’t know why so many have been blinded to this defiant act against the MOST HIGH YHWH. For years we have warned to little avail. Btw, I have since discovered that early on Tantric Buddhism was schooled by the Jesuits in organizing their monastic forces. No wonder they love working together. Such a veil has been drawn over the masses. Only YHWH can remove it. So here’s their research:
[For future reference, notice that the demoness is nailed down and her head is geomatically oriented to the northeast].
{Before you read the following, watch my overview video that I had put together a number of years ago. This will give you a perspective on what you are about to read. I just ran across the text from Digital Tibetan Altars website the other day, many years after I pieced together the other video, so you’ll see that it fills in many of the blanks and actually confirms what I had surmissed to be true.
This is taken from the site Digital Tibetan Altar. It’s not an easy read, but you get a fuller idea of the basis of their worldview. Warning. All this is basically what one would call geomancy, which deals with manipulation of the order of God, in other words it is occultic, magic in so many words:
“In our first articles on this subject, Tibetan Geomancy, and Tibetan Geomancy: Part Two, we have been exploring rudimentary themes. In the instant post, we are going to explore these themes in a bit more depth, by taking comparative notice of Chinese and Indian geomancy. Once again, “geomancy” is an uncomfortable word as applied in either case, but we use it for the sake of handiness, albeit incorrectly. We are going to begin with a quick look at what the Chinese call wu hsing, the Indians call  panchabhuta, and everybody else calls the “five elements.”
I suppose the threshold question is, who got what from where?
I doubt we can answer that question by opening books. The hermeneutical hunt for India’s first Chinese visitor, or China’s first Indian visitor, depends upon deciphering archaic allusions in Indian texts, Chinese texts, and those of the Greeks and Romans. Until we get the lexicology well in hand we will be crossing this part of history the way a small boy crosses a creek, by hopping from stone to stone. I mention this simply because we cannot claim to know whether — as it is applied to geomancy, and strictly in that sense only — the Chinese dragged five element theory back from India, or the Indians dragged it home from China. We can suspect the Chinese received it from India, and chances are we can make a convincing argument, but we cannot be absolutely certain.
In part, this is because India’s five elements and China’s five elements are rather different from one another. The Indian panchabhuta are earth, water, air, fire, and space. The Chinese wu hsing are wood, fire, earth, metal, water. They are not only different in a component sense, but as we shall see, they are regarded differently.
Wu hsing theory seems to arise in China somewhere between 350 BCEand 270 BCE, during the lifetime of the scholar Tsou Yen. You can get some argument about that, pushing the date back to before 400 BCE, but the later dates are substantially established. Of Tsou Yen, the great Cambridge historian Joseph Needham writes:
“If he was not the sole originator of Five-Element theory, he systematized and stabilised ideas on the subject which had been floating about, especially in the eastern seaboard States of Chhi and Yen, for not more than a century at most before his time.”
So, what did Tsou Yen understand as wu hsing? The character wu is simple: it is the cardinal number five. The character hsing demands elaboration. In antiquity, hsing was a pictograph representing a cross-roads or confluence of courses. It is a radical character which at its root has come to mean motility: to do, to act, to walk, to travel. It can also be taken to mean process, conduct, behavior, or way, which definitions should be enough to sketch the sort of thoughts and images Chinese philosophers have grouped behind this radial.
Taking its pictographic sense together with the common denominator of its usage over many centuries, I have always translated hsing as “course” when used in the context here discussed. Thus, for me, the wu hsing are the “five courses.”
For the rest of the world, “five elements” is the preferred translation, to be taken in either one of two ways. “Elements,” as in elemental or fundamental, and having an active sense, or “elements” as on passive substances, the latter idea being a product of component symbolisms. Use of the term “five elements” is so pervasive one can hardly expect to root it out. One occasionally also sees “five agents,” “five forces,” “five processes,” “five qualities,” or “five properties,” which are just variations on the same theme. There is also an earlier concept, the wu cai, or five materials upon which all human existence depends, and some have suggested this is the origin of the wu hsing.
No matter how we translate the term, what we are really talking about are five basic categories or taxonomic indica under which mutually dependent phenomena having related characteristics can be classed, each evolving to the next in cyclic order.
Before delving into the issue of order, I want to stop and take notice of the panchabhuta, or the pancha mahabhutas. “Pancha” simply means five. The Sanskrit word “bhuta” can have several meanings, but the root meanings are truth, reality, natures, that which anything consists of, i.e. elemental, or that which is self-evident. So, in the sense of the mahabhutas, “great” or “gross” bhutas, we are seeing five self-evident natures that all things consist of.
The mahabhutas are recognized in the Vedic age. Just exactly where, I cannot say, because I simply have not studied the matter. They obviously predate the wu hsing, which fall in the Maurya Empire according to Indian reckoning, by a considerable margin. Almost certainly, the concept arises from the Vedic nature deities.
What the early Chinese know as feng shui, the Indians approach as vastushastra, or the science of vastu. This is said to have originated with the Sthapatya Veda, which is a part of Atharva Veda. This would date it to somewhere around the  classical Mantra period of Vedic Sanskrit, at the end of second millennium BCE. The term itself could be translated as the “science of abiding,” or the “science of dwellings,” and actually forms the basis of architecture. The idea is quite probably intertwined with the concept of “lord architect of the world” Viśvákarma, and the relations between his five children. Later, it comes to be associated with Brahma, and a number of other gods. It really does not have anything to do with “geomancy” at all — neither does feng shui for that matter — but, since the late twentieth century, that is a word we have connected with the practice.
In the initial stages, vastu is concerned with the effect of light on man-made structures: with the efficient use of sunlight. However, at a very early date in its development — and again, I do not know exactly when: although certainly prior to Buddhism — it comes to be founded on the fundamental concept of balance — or properly speaking, harmony — between structures and the mahabhutas. I should probably mention that this is with narrow reference to construction. Classical vastu does not entertain the notion of “improving” structures that already exist.
Earlier, we mentioned order. In Chinese practice, the five elements are believed to relate to one another in particular orders. These orders are origination order, which expresses how the elements arise; mutual production order, which expresses how they act to produce each other; mutual destruction order, which expresses how they act to overcome one another; controlling order, which expresses how they interact with each other; masking order, which is another expression of interaction, and common, or “modern” order, which is simply a means of listing them.
[JCS: Sounds like the New World Order doesn’t it?]

In Tibetan practice, these orders are expressed as “affinities,” so we see concepts like “mother” (in early Sino-Tibetan practice “father”) “filial,” “friend,” and “enemy.” All of these various orders are common enough in the literature that I am not eager to reproduce them here. Still, I know my readers well enough to realize you will complain if I do not.

[1] Mutual Production Order

  • Wood produces Fire
  • Fire Produces Earth
  • Earth produces Metal
  • Metal produces Water
  • Water produces Wood

[2] Mutual Destruction Order

  • Wood destroys Earth
  • Earth destroys Water
  • Water destroys Fire
  • Fire destroys Metal
  • Metal destroys Wood

[3] Controlling Order

  • Wood destroys Earth, Metal controls Wood
  • Metal destroys Wood, Fire controls Metal
  • Fire destroys Metal, Water controls Fire
  • Water destroys Fire, Earth controls Water
  • Earth destroys Water, Wood controls Earth

[4] Masking Order

  • Wood destroys Earth, Fire produces Earth and masks
  • Metal destroys Wood, Water produces Wood and mask
  • Fire destroys Metal, Earth produces Metal and masks
  • Water destroys Fire, Wood produces Fire and masks
  • Earth destroys Water, Metal produces Water and masks

So, from these, the Tibetans deduced their systems of water being the mother of wood, wood being the son of water, water being the friend of earth,  earth being the enemy of water, and so forth. How this might come about is interesting. Originally, filial concepts were attached to the trigrams. We had a father, a mother, eldest son, middle son, youngest son, eldest daughter, second daughter, youngest daughter. Those on the father’s side are yang, those on the mother’s side are yin. So, as applied to the elements, this becomes parent, child, enemy and friend.

[1] Mother

  • Mother of Wood is Water
  • Mother of Water is Metal
  • Mother of Metal is Earth
  • Mother of Earth is Fire
  • Mother of Fire is Wood

[2] Child

  • Child of Wood is Fire
  • Child of Fire is Earth
  • Child of Earth is Metal
  • Child of Metal is Water
  • Child of Water is Wood

[3] Enemy

  • Enemy of Wood is Metal
  • Enemy of Metal is Fire
  • Enemy of Fire is Water
  • Enemy of Water is Earth
  • Enemy of Earth is Wood

[4] Friend

  • Friend of Wood is Earth
  • Friend of Earth is Water
  • Friend of Water is Fire
  • Friend of Fire is Metal
  • Friend of Metal is Wood
The importance of the elements in Chinese practice is with exclusive reference to these orders. The importance of the elements in Indian practice is with reference to appreciation of individual potency. The Chinese believe in movement, whereas the Indians seem to be following set rules. One source gives the following example:

“Energy is primarily considered as emanating from the northeast corner and many site and building characteristics are derived from this. Sites sloping down towards north or east from higher levels of south and west are considered good. Open spaces in site and openings in the building are to be more in the north and east than in the south and the west. No obstacles are to be present in the north and the east. Levels and height of buildings are to be higher in the south and west when compared to the north and east. The southwest corner is to be the highest, followed by southeast, then by northwest and finally by northeast. The triangle formed by joining the southwest, southeast and the northwest corner of the site is attributed to the moon and the triangle formed by joining the northeast, northwest and southeast corner of the site is attributed to the sun. The former are prescribed to be heavier and higher and the latter light and lower. Sites having a longer east-west axis are considered better. The diagonal connecting southwest and northeast is to be longer than the diagonal connecting southeast and northwest. An extended northeast corner is considered beneficial.”

These are the exact conditions followed when building Tibetan temples, even to the present day.In expression of their approach, Indian practitioners developed the Purusha Mandala, which is superimposed on the landscape, and used to orient construction from the ground up.
The “houses” of the Purusha Mandala are fixed. They are represented by a square — symbolizing the earth — imposed on the body of a being. The head is always in the northeast.
[JCS: Here I have turned the Purusha Mandala to match magnetic north in order that one may compare the nailed down demoness I have superimposed over the Map of the United States. You must look carefully, but underneath the transparency are Buddhist temples, centers, monasteries and stupas. It has become more obvious over the years that these religious centers have not been placed in a happenstance manner. As a matter of fact, tantric vases have been buried in every state capital, the US Capitol, major rivers, lakes, mountain peaks, national parks and sacred places across the US. The US is the first country they have totally completed]. 
hindu-mandala-pattern
Do you recall how I had earlier pointed out that the Dalai Lama’s American Headquarters is in upper state New York?
WomentiedDown​Where tantric vases have been buried on Turtle Island.
08 01 2016 Peace Vase Map of Turtle Island Alaska Canada USA Hawaii Mexico
[JCS: Therefore the Dalai Lama’s American Headquarters is in Upper State New York at the Namgyal Monastery which is near Ithaca and has been named the new site for the Dalai Lama Center not unlike the Presidential libraries, but for the Dalai Lama. 
mayor-of-ithaca-welcomes-the-construction-of-a-presidential-like-library-center-for-the-study-of-all-the-dalai-lamas-in-ny
“Ithaca Mayor Svante Myrick announced that the Dalai Lama selected the town of Ithaca from dozens of cities to be the site of an international center for Buddhism. The cultural center — called “His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama’s Library and Museum” — will be built on South Hill. Myrick says that the library and museum will contain “the writings, teachings, and artifacts of all 14 Dalai Lamas,” referring to the monks who have served as the spiritual leaders of Tibetan Buddhism for centuries.”
The “being” is said to be  formless spirit who blocked heaven from earth, and had to be subdued by Brahma and the other gods. So, each geomantic house is ruled by a particular god, with Brahma in the center. Thus:

  • North is ruled by Kubera, the lord of wealth.
  • South is ruled by Yama, the lord of death.
  • East is ruled by Indra, the solar deity.
  • West is ruled by Varuna, the lord of water.
  • Northeast is ruled by Shiva.
  • Southeast is ruled by Agni, the deity of fire.
  • Northwest is ruled by Vayu, lord of the winds.
  • Southwest is ruled by Niruthi, lord of ancestors.
  • The center is ruled by Brahma.

Apart from its mythological structure, this mandala is actually the framework for an exquisitely detailed set of mathematical rules, having nothing to with elements, but everything to do with hard measurement.

[JCS: Btw, Kathmandu Valley in Nepal is laid out according to a giant mandala].

In parts one and two of our little survey of Tibetan geomancy, we have been discussing Queen Kon-jo. When Wengchen Kon-jo comes to Tibet from China, in 641 CE, her geomantic masterpiece — or metaphor — is the siting of Lhasa’s central temple, Jokhang.

The story is that Kon-jo determined Tibet’s landforms resembled a demoness lying on her back, so various smaller temples and stupas had to be constructed before Jokhang could be successfully completed.

When we examine this approach in contrast with the Purusha Mandala, it certainly becomes suggestive, doesn’t it?

Chinese and Indian approaches were tossed into Tibet’s cultural grinder, with the eventual result that spirits of the earth were now being dredged up and subdued according to a moving position.

The concept of the grid is coming from India, but the concept of motion is coming from China. Basically, the grid is being laid on a site, and four corners are assigned.

The southeast corner is fire, the southwest corner is the demoness, the northwest corner is wind, and the northeast corner is power. The spirit — by this time a naga — is believed to rotate within this square according to the season, and even, as some would have it, according to the year, month, day and hour. The grid is divided into some 8,000 parts, the head of the spirit is aligned, and a “vital point” is established — usually in the spirit’s armpit — where the first disturbance of the soil is to occur.

[JCS: Notice that the demoness is literally nailed to the earth].

It is right about here that we begin to think about the difference between gross and subtle elements, and their lasting — if not thoroughly troublesome — metaphor, the relationship between seen and unseen: the relationship between men and spirits.

[JCS: Notice that in the demoness’ right side a hole is dug into the earth and a tantric vase is buried in the earth. This looks precisely like one of the 6,000 ritual vases made in Bhutan that are being buried all over the world.
Buddhist tantric vase buried in Westminster Abby by the Dalai Lama.

Buddhist tantric vase buried in Westminster Abby by the Dalai Lama.

The Dalai Lama even placed one in Westminster Cathedral. One is also buried in Washington, DC near the National Christmas Tree and Washington Monument or Baal’s shaft].

Of spirits, in Chinese, Tibetan, and Indian practice, one could write an almost endless number of volumes.

At the very least, maybe we will get around to a few paragraphs in a future post.[JCS: So why the Kalachakra in Washington, DC?  
Answer:  http://www.worldviews101.com/?p=1895
US Map Work on Tantric Buddhist sand mandalas, stupas, vases, and blood relic tours
 
by James C. Stephens

Over the years I have compiled maps on the locations where Tibetan sand mandalas have been constructed by traveling teams of Tibetan lamas from various monasteries and tour groups. Some have been financed by Richard Gere, others are by invitation from the US Federal, State and local governments, universities. Churches have also invited them in to be built as well as museums, festivals, wherever they find receptive sponsors.

At the Seventh International Conference on Buddhist Christian Dialogue held at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, one session held off campus at Hsi Lai Buddhist Temple in Hacienda Heights focused on the “Mandalization of US Politics.”  Sand mandalas involve a ritual of territorial possession and are highly organized metaphysically and have even involved their enemies blood mingled with the sand according to Dalton in his well documented and researched book, Taming of Demons which focuses on the altars of blood Tibetan Buddhists were actively building whose documents were discovered in the Dunhuang Caves in China on the Silk Road.
Here are some links to the maps that I have worked on over the years, which do not include some of my earlier renditions that I tracked by hand on a map of the United States of the first flurry of 300 sand mandalas financed by the Richard Gere Foundation’s Mystical Arts and Sacred Dance tour of the Drepung Monks way back when. Some of the maps also include the Heart Shrine Relic Tour of Buddhist blood and relics, the burying of tantric vases under the program called Siddhartha’s intent out of Bhutan.
All of these are leading to a culmination of their dark spiritual work to the Maitreya Project being built in Bodh Gaya, India where the Dalai Lama will preside over the Kalachakra initiation beginning in January 2017.
1)This map was put together at the last election in 2012 where many mandalas were built in State Capital Buildings and in Universities where the Presidential debates took place. Unfortunately, both political parties are involved at the highest levels in opening doors to the Tibetan practices that they accept as cultural, without any proper understanding of the deeper spiritual implications of the defilement of the land by idolatry disguised as art. https://drive.google.com/open?id=1uhd_FaOxAtBqvRXPch_3cxks1J0&usp=sharing
2. Here is a link to the present 2016 Mystical Tour of the Tibetan Monks in the UShttps://drive.google.com/open?id=1QF3h9aBLimSL_iJ3xCyvrR4UgiE&usp=sharing
3. Tibetan Buddhist influences in Washington, DC. Sites of influence of the XIV Dalai Lama and Tibetan Buddhist influences in Washington DC and surrounding region, including but not limited to sand mandalas, tantric vases, Blood relic tour, initiation ceremonies have been conducted, White House visits and award ceremonies, where the Nechung Oracle has visited, etc. https://drive.google.com/open?id=1-SkgQ6PAbG_vDBXvFlSFRpOQBOw&usp=sharing
4. Tibetan Buddhist Activities and rituals in St. Louis, the site of the Second US Presidential Debate also the home to Urbana Student Mission Conference every three years. https://drive.google.com/open?id=1K6oph438NapyircXeBFuBFChjWA&usp=sharing
5. Sand Mandalas and Tantric Vase locations in the USA. https://drive.google.com/open?id=1r3IcJqYiLJO4zlSVaP5UEq13Gmw&usp=sharing 
7.  Tantric Vases planted in US.  Bhutanese Vajrayana Buddhists established Siddhartha’s Intent and created over 6,000 Tantric Vases they euphemistically call Peace Vases.            https://drive.google.com/open?id=1A-hbBt5LVVX-eYztVtmgqflEin0&usp=sharing

Two Faces of a Tibetan Idol in America

March 07 2014 DL WDC National Cathedral Interfaith Dialogue

An Icon of Light with a Shady Side
by Tilman Müller and Janis Vougioukas
English Translation of an excellent German article in Stern Magazine published in 2009.

When visiting Germany this week, the Dalai Lama will again be lauded as a messiah. The head of Tibetans is regarded as a symbol of tolerance. But critics in his exile community fail in demanding religious freedom and democracy.

He always comes in a large convoy like a president, bodyguards surrounding him, movie stars and managers forming honour guards. Politicians in charge hurry to welcome him. The scene may be the same this week in Frankfurt [Germany], just as it was in Nuremberg last year. The Dalai Lama greeted the crowds with his lovely child-like waving of hands. But his speech in the town hall made people halt their breath, as reported by a local newspaper next day.

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He catered the elect audience saying he saw Nuremberg already on photographs when he was still a child: “very attractive with generals and weapons“ and with “Adolf Hitler and Hermann Goering“.
Some of the auditors seemed to be “embarrassed”, some were “alienated for a second;” Nuremberg’s chief mayor Ulrich Maly calls it a “moment of shock“. The special guests tried to get him self afterwards out of the affair by stating that as a child he wasn’t able to foresee the Nazi catastrophe.

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If the Pope had given himself room for such statements in the city of the Reichsparteitage [NSDAP party summits] and the race laws, there would have been a loud outcry in the republic [of Germany]. But the head of Tibetan Buddhists is willingly excused for such words although His Holiness has enough reason to critically think about Nazi history. He who bears the title of the “Ocean of Wisdom” always had a very close relationship to his teacher Heinrich Harrer, a famous alpinist and author (“Seven years in Tibet”). Harrer had been a snappy Nazi who for a long time tried to hide the fact that he used to hold the rank of SS-Oberscharführer [Senior Squad Leader of the Schutz-Staffel (SS) or Protective Echelon of Adolf Hitler]. The Tibetan court used to have close ties with the NS-regime.

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SS-expeditions were welcomed to Lhasa with full mark of respect. Until today, His Holiness never distanced himself from these inglorious relationships. But this is not the only dark chapter in his story of success.

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The Dalai Lama smiles away all doubts. Almost everywhere he receives the same god-like veneration. In the West he appears as the super idol of the new age but in the Himalayans he governs like a medieval potentate. A gentle do-gooder who can show a surprisingly intolerant yes dictator-like behaviour. His people’s sad fate, suppressed by Beijing and expulsed, hides the inner problems of the Dalai Lama-regime.

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Here [in Germany] people attracted by him fill stadiums like coming to see a pop star. In Nuremberg 7,000 people listened to him, in Hamburg two years ago 30.000 and Frankfurt Commerzbank-Arena expects 40.000 visitors these days. The tickets range from € 10 to € 230 and usually are booked one year in advance. In conjunction with his huge events, there came up a unique spiritual supermarket. 728 German and 908 English books from and about the Dalai Lama are listed with amazon, 13,200 videos at youtube, almost 8 million entries in google. The son of Tibetan peasants is the most popular of all living noble laureates.

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Members of all religions and also atheists come like pilgrims to his one-man-shows. “We had direct eye-contact”, a young woman in the German city of Moenchengladbach shouted out over-happily and immediately promised to stop smoking henceforth. “He makes me feel good”, a woman in Boston says in excitement and puts it into a nutshell, “it’s his aura, this simpleness”.

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Just in Europe and the US, the birthplaces of the Age of Enlightenment, this Buddhist messiah formed new strongholds of his religion and he also finds favour with the usually critical-thinking generation of 68 [the left wing student protest movement in Europe] In 1971, Stern Magazine [The magazine where this article was published] celebrated him as the “saint on the mountain”, Spiegel Magazine romanticised him to be a “god to touch” two years ago.

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The head of the powerful German publishing house Springer, Mathias Döpfner, ex-porn queen Dolly Buster, German football star Mehmet Scholl, former economy minister Otto Graf Lambsdorff, and the inventor of the famous Love Parade Dr. Motte venerate Tenzin Gyatso, the 14th Dalai Lama.

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Where does that huge excitement come from? Christianity is loosing prestige and believers. That left a vacuum giving Buddhism a space to develop in the west as some kind of wellness-religion. And the peaceful calmness of the Dalai Lama makes you feel comfortable in the rough daily rat-race. His positive charisma seems to ban all fear of crisis. On top of this, there arose a Tibet romanticism in the West transfiguring  the snow land on the roof of the world where the Dalai Lama had been born in 1935 in a hut with juniper rain-pipes.

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The Asia expert Orville Schell, president of the New York Center of Sino-American Relations, explained the development of the Tibet-Myth from its remote position for centuries in innumerable works. The lack of knowledge gave birth to fantasies. It all started back in 1933 with James Hilton’s novel “Lost Horizon”, first published in German titled “Irgendwo in Tibet – Somewhere in Tibet”. The action was set in the sunshine paradise Shangri-La where no one had to work and everyone is living in eternal peace. The dream factory of Hollywood later on could use all these fantasies, creating a symbiosis of Tibet and pop culture, and created a monument for Tenzin Gyatso with the movie “Kundun”. “Because Tibet has always been so inaccessible, it existed in western imagination rather as a dream than as reality. It was supposed to be a country we could project our post-modern longings to”, Schell says.

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“I am for you whatever you want me to be for you”, the Dalai Lama says and in that way, alpinist Reinhold Messner regards him as “a fighter for environment protection”. German movie director and Oscar prize winner Florian Henckel von Donnermarck appreciates that “he makes happiness one of his religion’s core principals.” Actress Uma Thurman expects absolution for making the bloodthirsty violent movie “Kill Bill”: “The Dalai Lama would die laughing” if watching the movie. And the Dalai Lama takes part in that game, he is open to all directions at one’s will.

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He is a perfect tool for presidents and heads of government as even George W. Bush looks peaceful when being with him. The hyper active Nicolas Sarkozy looks gentle, and boring Roland Koch [prime minister of the German state of Hessen] at least seems to have some esprit. Especially with conservative and right-wing politicians this game of mutual instrumentalisation works especially well. The Dalai Lama had strong sympathy for the Austrian right-wing Jörg Haider and visited him several times in his Austrian state of Kaernten.

Buddhist tantric vase buried in Westminster Abby by the Dalai Lama.

Buddhist tantric vase buried in Westminster Abby by the Dalai Lama.

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Although the head of Tibetans is already 74, he is touring the West so intensively only for a relatively short time now. In June 1979, he visited Mont Pèlerin at Lake Geneva giving his first public teaching to a greater audience in the west. “There was not much interest regarding the Dalai Lama and we couldn’t even get police protection for him,” one of the then organizers, today living in Switzerland, tells us.

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In the meanwhile, the Dalai Lama became popular to the world but isn’t it anymore to all the monasteries. “There had been a break in our community about ten years ago,” a former companion says. In the first line it was about a protective saint the brotherhood is not allowed to worship anymore. But basically this religious quarrel is a struggle for power with intrigues, slandering, and intimidation continued until today. Out of fear of repression the confidant of the Dalai Lama asks to stay anonymous. The “Tibetan Community of Switzerland”, an organisation strongly devoted to the Dalai Lama called on all Tibetans in Switzerland having passed their 18th birthday to “immediately” stop the worship of the Tibetan protective deity Dorje Shugden and to sign an 8-point-agreement: “Those few Tibetans publicly and for no reason criticising the Dalai Lama are regarded to be Chinese collaborators by us.”

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This strategy of “either being with me or against me” and the rigid tone absolutely don’t fit to the gentle manner in which the “Übervater” [super-father] is usually presenting himself to the West. His royal court in Dharamsala still follows the feudalist structure of the old Tibet and is ruled by oracles and rituals that do not have much in common with western tolerance and transparency. The Dalai Lama’s sudden prohibition of the protective deity Shugden who had been worshipped since the 17th century and is one out of hundreds of saints in the Tibetan Buddhist canon in 1996 deeply alienated many religious Tibetans. For them it is incomprehensible and outsiders hardly can grasp how rigorous it is enforced. About one third of the 130,000 exile Tibetans are supposed to have worshipped Shugden before the ban. Today there are only a few thousand to openly show their connection to the cult. There are no independent estimations regarding the 5 million Tibetans inside China.

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The journalist Beat Regli in 1998 for the first time showed emotional pictures of that imminent conflict in the Indian exile communities in Swiss television [Schweizer Fernsehen, SF – Dalai Lama and Dorje Shugden]. Highly aged monks regretted crying that they didn’t already die before the prohibition of Shugden. A desperate family whose house had been set alight is presented as well as wanted posters denouncing Shugden followers and a Dalai Lama uncompromisingly defending his ban. “Wrong, wrong” he sounds off in a cold and sharp way nobody in the west has ever expected from the ever smiling noble laureate.

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In Dharamsala this quarrel is continuing to the present day. Monks not following the Dalai Lama’s order report of massive discrimination. Relatives and friends are put under pressure and vendors put posters on their shop’s doors saying “No Entrance” for Shugden-believers.

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In southern Indian city of Mundgod, Ganden Shartse monastery last year celebrated the inauguration of a new prayer hall. “It was supposed to become a great feast” one monk present at the time remembers. He is afraid to say his name. The Dalai Lama himself came and with him a number of other high ranking dignitaries. But almost everything talked about in the speeches and lectures was the old controversial topic of Dorje Shugden. Shortly afterwards the monks are said to have been told to sign a declaration stating they were no longer praticing Shugden. The monastery’s administration even erected a man-high wall through the monastic yard.

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In the meanwhile the dispute was handed over to the court. Dorje Shugden Society filed a complaint at New Delhi’s High Court in order to check whether this “religious discrimination” is acceptable under Indian law. A decision is expected for the end of this year. Dalai Lama says Shugden worship is harmful to his life and to the “cause of Tibet” with no further statements available. His opposition suspects that Shugden, who is also exhorted as an oracle, was prohibited for being a concurrence to the Dalai Lama’s state oracle.

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The Tibetan Governement-in Exile (TGE) nevertheless rejects all accusations. “There are only very few of those people left and they are completely financed by PRC. They are the only ones still talking about this topic,” TGE’s prime minister Samdhong Rinpoche says. Being paid by the Chinese is the worst accusation for any Tibetan.

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The Tibetan refugee’s capital is situated in the small town of Mc Leod Ganj, next to the district capital Dharamsala and twelve hours by bus from New Delhi. The Dalai Lama and members of his closest staff moved into the former residence of the British administration in 1960 with thousands of devotees following him. Among many Indians of that region, Mc Leod Ganj is known as “Little Lhasa”. It is a tiny place with two dusty one way roads winding up the mountain.

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About 600,000 enlightenment-tourists come here every year. Loud music flows from cafés and bars into the valley and little stands with religious kitsch stand side by side along the roads, one of them even offering “monk’s fashion”. Young Tibetans here wear Jeans and T-Shirts whereas the western tourists usually dress like actors in biblical movies. Little Lhasa has become the “Ballermann” [an area with lots of clubs, bars, and discotheques in Palma de Mallorca famous among German tourists to the Spanish island] for spiritual seekers.

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The small government district is a short way down the hill with tiny ministries, a parliament, and a library. The Dalai Lama again and again underlines that Tibetans in exile have built up a democratic system. There is a parliament with 43 to 46 seats. All sessions are recorded on DVD and then sent into the refugee settlements. On a theoretical basis the parliament may decide against the Dalai Lama. “But this never happened,” says the parliament’s president Penpa Tsering. “Everyone has great confidence into His Holiness. He sees the Tibetan question from many different angles, receives lots of information and is very, very logical.”

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For a long time, His Holiness’ family members held high positions. Since 2001 the prime minister is elected directly. In 2006’s elections, he received more than 90% of the votes and thus was confirmed in office. The main goal of Little Lhasa’s political structure is to confirm the Dalai Lama’s decisions and to solidify his power. Parties are absolutely irrelevant and the separation of state and church is not mentioned in the exile Tibetan Charta although it avows itself to the “ideals of democracy” in nice sounding words.

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In 1990, the independent Tibetan newspaper “mang-tso” (democracy) was published for the first time and quickly became the most important piece of media for Little Lhasa’s refugee community. “We wrote on election fraud, corruption, and everything else existent in every other country as well,” says Jamyang Norbu, then editor-in-chief. “Mang-tso” was uncomfortable and its editors didn’t allow themselves to be intimidated when some of them received death threats and the paper boys were threatened in the streets. In 1996, the situation got even worse, shortly after the newspaper published an article on the Aum sect which was responsible for poisonous gas attacks on Tokyo’s metro in 1995 killing 12 and leaving hundreds injured. The terrorist sect’s leader, Shoko Asahara on several occasions met the Dalai Lama. Even weeks after the first assault, Dalai Lama called him a “friend, yet not a perfect one.” Only later he went on distance to the sect. “Reporters Without Boarders” then said that due to that article “the religious authorities immediately put ‘mang-tso’ under pressure.” It had to close down; that was the end of “democracy”.

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Criticism or public debates are not welcomed in Little Lhasa. Dalai Lama prefers to ask gods and demons for advice. His Holiness’ official state oracle is called Thubten Ngodup, born in 1958. He is living in Nechung monastery right behind the parliament.

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For centuries now, the Dalai Lamas seek oracle advice in all important religious and political decisions. After his predecessor had died, Thubten Ngodup became the Dalai Lama’s official fortune-teller in 1987. It is said that he became aware his qualification in various dreams and visions for the first time. Another hint for his supernatural skills was his oftentimes bleeding nose.
Whenever the Dalai Lama has a question, Thubten Nodup would put on his 40-kg ritual garment. Incense would be burnt and his assistants would put a huge crown on his head. Then the oracle would start dancing to the music of horns and cymbals until he would enter a trance murmuring words only well-trained ears can understand. Dalai Lama strongly believes in his predictions. Looking back he found out that “the oracle was always right,” he once said.

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This is not what democracy looks like and yet there is not much criticism regarding his way of governing for reasons of solidarity with a suppressed people facing the super power China. Drawn out of his country, the Tibetan head has to see the cruel injustice happening there and the old culture slowly being destroyed.

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The communist leaders in Beijing try to defame the Dalai Lama by calling him “wolf in monk’s robes” or “devil with a human face and a beast’s heart”. At the same time, Chinese security forces suppress even the slightest move towards freedom on the Tibetan plateau. So one doesn’t have to wonder for most Westeners stepping on the side of the weak.

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But Tibet never was the paradise it is in western imagination. When the Chinese marched into it in 1950, it was stuck up in the medieval era with monks and aristocrats sharing the power. Most people were slaves, serfs, or under debt bondage. The system was protected by a brutal religious police with whips and bars and many monasteries had their own prisons. Even the Dalai Lama’s friend Heinrich Harrer was shocked: “The monks’ rule in Tibet is unique and may only be compared to a strong dictatorship. They are suspicious of any influence from the outside that may endanger their power. They are intelligent enough not to believe in their unlimited power but they will immediately punish anyone who dares to doubt it.” Harrer reports of a man who stole a golden butter lamp from a temple. At first his hand were publicly amputated and then “his mutilated body was sewn into a wet yak skin. They let it dry and then threw it down a ravine.”

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After the occupation, the Chinese presented themselves as the Tibetan people’s liberators and destroyed the monasteries. And they built up a new system of suppression. They oftentimes point out that despite of his peace messages the Dalai Lama supports the armed resistance in his homeland, himself being supported by “foreign imperialists”. In deed the Dalai Lama’s two elder brothers built up connections with the US intelligence agency. During several years, CIA trained about 300 Tibetans in guerrilla war techniques at Camp Hale in the Rocky Mountains. In a full moon night in October 1957, the first Tibetan elite soldiers jumped out of a B-17 without nationality marking over Tibet. For the case of being caught by the Chinese, each of them carried a small container of cyanite.
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These Tibetan agents also protected the Dalai Lama’s flight to India permanently being in contact with the CIA via Morse messaging. Later on, the US financed the formation of a Tibetan rebel army in the Nepalese kingdom of Mustang. The programmes were stopped when the US intensified their trading with China in the early 1970s.

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Regarding Buddhism rather as an esoteric cult than as a religion, many of the Dalai Lama’s followers are astonished when hearing of their idol working hand in hand with the US intelligence agencies. Or when they hear that Buddhism spread in Asia as with much bloodshed as Islam did in Arabia or as the Christian crusades. Again and again Tibetan monasteries had brutal fights against each other. Buddhism is not necessarily more tolerant than other religions. In an interview with “Playboy” magazine, Dalai Lama called homosexual practices “misconduct”. The teachings also condemn “having oral or anal sex with your wife or another female partner”. Similar passages had been deleted from his “Ethics for a New Millennium” on his publisher’s advice.

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Dalai Lama is in favour of harmony. But he will have to face the confrontation as there is growing criticism in his own exile community. “His Holiness is living in a bubble without contact to the outside world,” says Lhasang Tsering, a long term activist. He is now running a bookstore in Little Lhasa. “Religion and politics should finally be separated.”

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This is also what Jamyang Norbu is stipulating. “Dalai Lama is not a bad person”, says “mang-tso’s” former editor-in-chief. “But he begins to be a hindrance to our development. We don’t have democracy. Many things today are even worse than in 1959. Then we had three political powers: Dalai Lama, the monasteries, and the nobility.” Today the only leading figure left is the Dalai Lama.

© STERN

Confession of an Unfaithful Bride

1. Confession of an unfaithful Bride:

July 1 2014 Pope Paul and the Dalai Lama and African Bishop

Failure of the Church in the United States of America to maintain its historic roots as a Free Church purchased by the blood of martyrs under the direct authority of the LORD Jesus Christ of Nazareth after 178 years, when in 1954 Senator Lyndon Baines Johnson sponsored a bill establishing the 501 (c) 3 in order to silence the Church selling our eternal inheritance for temporal government favor. The US Government as any temporal power is subject to moral corruption and now actively supports Tibetan Buddhism, and sponsors the Dalai Lama as an instrument of its global political agenda. He was the first Buddhist leader to open the US Senate in prayer and as God-King of Tibet met with every President since Franklin D. Roosevelt. He consults the Nechung Oracle on a regular basis who has met with many leaders in Washington, DC. Leviticus 19:31. The Dalai Lama was the key speaker at the Second Anniversary of September 11, 2001 at the National Cathedral and awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, the country’s highest civilian honor. Joel 2:12-17; Rev. 18:1-8.

 

2. Sad Consideration of the Apostasy of the Church.

October 10 2012 DePaul Sand Mandala One World Religion all religions whats it going to be

In 1993, the Roman Catholic and Tibetan monastics secretly met in Chicago at the Parliament of the World’s Religions. Since then, Catholic Universities, Cathedrals, and Centers have sponsored conferences with the Dalai Lama and or the building of sand mandalas in the United States opening the door to idolatry and the ritual spiritual defilement of the land. They have been joined by Episcopalian, Methodist, Baptist, Moravian, Presbyterian, and other denominations in hosting Tibetan Buddhist lamas who have built sand mandalas in their chapels, hosted the Buddhist Blood Relics, or conducted Tibetan Buddhist healing rituals which directly violate the commandment “You shall have no other gods before Me.” Exodus 20:3; 2 Chronicles 36:14; Revelation 3:16-19; 17:1-18.

3. Repentance: Failure of the Church Gatekeepers.

2011-07-07T213842Z_01_WAS207_RTRIDSP_3_USA-TIBET

Over the last twenty five years, the Dalai Lama has been funded as a modern Balaam to speak in venues to vast numbers of students and adults in institutions which were initially founded to train pastors and missionaries to take the Gospel to the ends of the earth. We have failed to honor the fathers and mothers of the faith and have not attended to our duty to do the work of God in our generation and have failed as stewards to faithfully present an unadulterated Gospel of Jesus Christ to the Tibetan Buddhist world. Concurrently, the enemy has planted tantric vases in every state Capital, every high place, National Park, sacred sites, rivers, and lakes in the United States, including conducting the highest Tibetan occult ritual the Kalachakra Ceremony in the US Capitol. Leviticus 18:24, 25.

Shoplifting at Nordstrom

20150908_145904 (1)The other day, I was trying on some clothing at Nordstrom’s Rack and noticed their warning sign about shoplifting. I think it’s interesting that they begin with “Don’t steal” which is an abbreviated form of the eighth commandment “You shall not steal” found in Exodus 20:15. They follow that with “It’s bad karma” an assimilated concept of karma that Buddhists would define as “action driven by intention which leads to future consequences” which yield good or bad fruit in this life or the next depending on the deed. In the Judaeo-Christian faith, which holds to the fact that we have just one life and then comes the judgment, the Apostle Paul, said “Do not be deceived: God cannot be mocked. A man reaps what he sows.” (Galatians 6:7-8;Leviticus 25:3-5). The Nordstrom’s sign ends by stating, “Plus, shoplifters will be prosecuted.” Evidently, whoever put together this warning is weak on their understanding of the Buddhist concept of Karma and simply can’t wait til karma catches up with the thief. If they really believed in their religion/philosophy wouldn’t they just say, “It’s bad karma to take articles without paying for them?” So, they lean on the Law that tries and prosecutes the shoplifter in this life. I guess they just can’t wait. It affects their bottom line.

When you analyze the sign, it’s quite a confusing and mixed bag of Buddhism, Hinduism, Christianity and Judaism. An example of the collision and intermingling of religious language and terminology. And if we in Christian circles think we can get away with using pop terms, we need to think again. I recall sitting in a large well known evangelical church where the college pastor, commenting on how great their summer camp was saying, “I thought I died and went to Nirvana.” Language has meaning, a fact that is not lost on those who are attempting to hijack true love and introduce their own abominations to the mainstream who often simply haven’t a clue.

Journal of Young Buddhist Radical

My Spiritual Autobiography

(Click the highlighted link to hear a brief spiritual autobiography. Approximately 3 minutes.)

Photo: In 1970, the General Director George M. Williams, aka Masayasu Sadanaga of Nichiren Shoshu Academy, now known as SGI (Soka Gakkai International), visited California State University Northridge and gave a talk on Buddhism which I and several other members attended, among them Russ Dilando, Carol Dell, Jim Jay, Lance Stromsoe, and Mike Maeda. Steve Gore leaning over in the background was one of General Director Williams’ special assistants who accompanied him to his speaking engagements.

The Buddhist Next Door

The Buddhist Next Door

By James C. Stephens

Little Lisa on The Simpsons Christmas special, tired of the hypocrisy and commercialism of the Springfield church, decides to become a Tibetan Buddhist and is mentored by Richard Gere on prime-time television.

About the same time, John Altschuler, the producer and writer for King of the Hill, is given a book on the Buddha by his wife. He ends up writing a satire for an episode he nicknames, “He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Buddha.” In this episode, the Hills’ only child, Bobby, is recognized as an American reincarnation of the Lama Sanglug by immigrant monks, putting his father, Hank, through great angst as he unsuccessfully attempts to explain his Methodist worldview to his son. Ever so subtly, and, sometimes blatantly, Buddhism slips in uninvited to comfortable living rooms across America via mainstream media.

This influx of popular Buddhism began in 1960, when Masayasu Sadanaga (George M. Williams), a young student from Japan, stepped onto the UCLA campus with the resolve to introduce “true Buddhism” to America.

In 1970, I was swept up into the excitement of their movement to establish world peace through human revolution while studying political science on the campus of Cal State University Northridge. Thus began my 14-year journey into Buddhism, complete with many practices similar to evangelical Christianity-street witnessing, late-night discussion meetings and the singing of Buddhist sutras set to tunes such as “I’ve Been Working on the Railroad.”

My Buddhist worldview was challenged, however, while visiting Japan on an architecture tour. As I leaned over to put some postcards in my travel bag, someone yelled a warning at me in Japanese. Unfortunately, I didn’t speak Japanese, nor did I have time to move as a 200-pound sign blew over on my back. In shock, I was whisked away in a taxi to the hospital, suffering from a sharp blow to my spinal chord and a partially paralyzed arm. Ironically, the accident report read, “Act of God.”

While lying on several hospital beds in Japan, I struggled with troubling questions about the power of the Buddhist gods to save. After returning to the states, I joined Amway and became consistently exposed to the testimonies of Christians, and observed the importance faith played in their business and marriages. Initially, my wife and I just became more committed to becoming the first successful Buddhist distributors. Evidently, God had other plans.

The following three years were spent aggressively pursuing my business goals, while rubbing shoulders with godly friends who prayed for me, asked me convicting questions and gave me books that answered many of mine. After a month of frightening dreams, weighing the numerous prophecies of Christ with those of the Buddha and wrestling with 2 Peter 3:10 that spoke of the day of the Lord coming like a thief, I sought out a pastor who led me to Christ one hot July afternoon in 1984.

I began to thirst for more than fellowship. Weekly, I searched the church library looking for answers on issues that were of importance to me as a former Buddhist. I searched for books on Christian meditation, but found only those suggesting that Zen meditation made them better Christians. (I knew Zen from my studies and practice, and even as a new Christian saw it as incompatible with the Christian faith.)

This ideology is not confined to books alone. One friend claims that he was healed by his Zen priest’s treatments. Now at his doctor’s advice, he’s practicing Buddhist meditation at home-albeit with a twist: He uses the Lord’s prayer instead of praying to the Buddha. Although claiming to have a love of Christ, he has a very limited understanding of the theological underpinnings of his faith.

This confusion may be traced to the fact that a high percentage of evangelicals no longer believe in the exclusivity of the Christian faith. Instead, according to an August 2005 Beliefnet.com poll, “Eight in 10 Americans-including 68 percent of evangelicals-believe that more than one faith can be a path to salvation, which is most likely not what they were taught in Sunday school.”

Buddhist theology and practice is antithetical to biblical Christianity. For instance, the Buddhist objective in meditation is to empty one’s mind while seeking union with the cosmos, ultimately buying into the Serpent’s ancient lie, “You shall become as gods.”

Since we have already been saved through His grace, we don’t meditate to accumulate merit as would a Buddhist. Through contemplation, we focus our minds on His Word and His works, waiting upon Him and actively listening. Christian meditation takes discipline, but is only fruitful by the grace of God (see 2 Cor. 3:5; 9:8).

So, why do so many Christians neglect to share their faith with Buddhists? Many have willfully chosen to follow the latest popular religious fashions and put their theological mind on hold. According to research by Robert Wuthnow and Wendy Cadge published in Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion (September 2004), “Fifty-six percent of the American public thinks of Buddhists as tolerant, while 63 percent believe them to be peace-loving.”

In its August 2005 survey, Beliefnet.com posed the question, “Can a good person who isn’t of your religious faith go to heaven or attain salvation, or not?” Brace yourself for a shock. While 91 percent of Catholics said yes and 83 percent of non-evangelical Christians said yes, 68 percent of evangelicals said yes as well. Consider how elements of Buddhist ideology have become entwined in our thinking:

A youth pastor at a prominent evangelical church recently rose to the pulpit and gave a report on the success of their recent summer camp. He exclaimed, “It was so great, I thought I died and gone to nirvana.”

Another day, our children-keenly tuned to sniff out Buddhism’s subtle invasion into our culture-shared that their favorite history teacher who was teaching on world religions passed around a little fat Buddha statue and jokingly taught them to rub it for good luck. All this in a preppy private Christian high school in Southern California.

Another friend of mine occasionally travels to India and relayed a story about the many Pentecostals and charismatics he met there who were practicing Tibetan Buddhism. When I asked why, he said, “Most were seeking spiritual experiences, and while they loved Jesus as a teacher, they were not firmly grounded in the Scriptures and went astray as they sought the supernatural.”

We’ve also seen Baptists, Catholics, Methodists, Presbyterians, Episcopalians and Congregationalists slide into Buddhism. One pastor of a local church joined his wife in taking vows at the local Buddhist temple-while retaining his position as senior pastor of the church.

The primary struggle for every generation that is dedicated to missions and evangelism is coming to terms with how does the true gospel get translated into mainstream culture without compromise? How do we keep our faith and maintain our moral and theological standards while still living in the midst of an increasingly pluralistic society?

When an invasive pop culture and its terminology has become the norm, and millions are spent on conveying that message through the media, one cannot passively sit back and live in a 1950s religious cocoon. Daniel and his followers in Babylon faced similar tests of their faith. We are told that the godly will be persecuted. The question is, “Will we remain faithful?”